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How We Overcome Hypothyroidism When All Else Fails

By | 2017-04-24T22:51:09+00:00 July 6th, 2015|Hypothyroidism|166 Comments
  • hypothyroidism

This is Part 1 of a 3-part series on overcoming hypothyroidism:

It’s sad but true…

Most of the advice out there about hypothyroidism and even Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is dead wrong.

And I’m speaking from both personal and professional experience.

You see, we’ve always been at the forefront of health.

We were recommending our clients go gluten-free way back when people thought it was nothing more than selling snake oil.

How times have changed…

What else has changed drastically over the years is our entire approach to health.

Much of the popular thyroid advice out there today is the same exact old advice we used to give our clients all those years ago.

Unfortunately, our results back then were not living up to our standards.

And being someone who practices what he preaches, my own personal results were disappointing to say the least.

If you know me, then you know that I don’t settle for anything but the best for myself and my clients.

So, as we continued studying, researching, and discovering answers… our entire approach changed.

And so did our results.

Today I get lots of emails like this…

email-testimonial

And while our approach may be different than most everything else out there today, it’s for good reason.

While it may not be the most talked about approach, what we teach is ahead of its time and on the forefront of health today.

In this article, I’m going to reveal the systematic approach used to help Jeanette achieve the life-changing results she did.

It all started with simple steps like I show in my 3 Food Triple-Thyroid-Boosting Daily Protocol. If you suffer from hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, or a damaged metabolism, you will definitely want to to use this daily thyroid-boosting protocol because it will help you start seeing the results you want and deserve.

If you’ve ever tried treating your thyroid issue with medication alone, then you’re probably aware that for the vast majority of people…

…it just doesn’t work.

You might see some initial improvement, but there’s still something missing.

(Or like many hypothyroidism sufferers, you might even become more hypothyroid and feel worse.)

So, one thing that should be quite obvious is that your thyroid health depends on far more than just the health of your thyroid gland.

If not, everyone would simply take thyroid medication and be healed (just like today’s medical system would like you to believe).

There’s a reason that millions of hypothyroidism sufferers today fail to ever get relief or feel normal again.

It’s because of what I like to call the “Iceberg Effect”…

iceberg-effect

Much like an iceberg, hypothyroidism can be very deceiving.

What everyone focuses on today is the small part of the iceberg sticking out of the water…

…the obvious aspects of hypothyroidism.

But it’s only the tip of the iceberg.

It’s a small part of a much bigger and deeper rooted problem.

Below the water-line there are many other underlying causes of hypothyroidism that today’s medical approach doesn’t even know exists.

Unfortunately, most people go on to waste years or even decades of their lives focusing on the tip of the iceberg before realizing that it will never work.

What’s important to understand is…

There’s an entire Thyroid Hormone Pathway that exists which your thyroid hormone must travel down before it ever gets to your cells.

And with hypothyroidism, your pathway becomes blocked on multiple levels preventing your thyroid hormone from ever reaching your cells.

thyroid-hormone-pathway-infographic

If there’s one thing I want you to take away from all of this, it’s this…

If you can’t get the right thyroid hormone to your cells or your cells can’t metabolize that thyroid hormone efficiently, then you will always be hypothyroid.

And no amount of thyroid medication will ever change that.

So, we developed a system to fix the many underlying issues hidden at the bottom of the iceberg… to completely unblock your Thyroid Hormone Pathway and permanently restore your thyroid health.

Here are five steps we take with our clients and that are responsible for their life-changing results.

1. We Unblock Your Liver

It probably makes perfect sense that if you are hypothyroid, you need to treat your thyroid gland.

Well, people have asked me time and time again… “What’s the first thing I should do to heal my thyroid?”

My typical response which catches most by surprise is to… “Start by getting your liver healthy.”

Wait a second. Your liver?

Well, you might be surprised to learn that your liver is so important to your thyroid health, maybe even more important than your thyroid gland.

How many people can live without their thyroid gland? More than you think.

How many people can live without their liver? Not a single one.

Which one do YOU think might be more important?

While your thyroid gland produces thyroid hormone, your liver orchestrates how your body uses it.

When you become hypothyroid, one of the first things to happen is your liver becomes blocked and dysfunctional.

This leads to a domino like effect along your Thyroid Hormone Pathway causing your entire pathway to become blocked at multiple levels.

And leaving your body to struggle as it never gets the thyroid hormone it needs.

This is probably the most common issue we find in our clients. But we rarely if ever find only one issue.

And because the effects are so far reaching, it’s generally the first thing we address with our clients.

When it comes to unblocking your Liver, there are a number of things we have to fix…

  • Re-activate the conversion of your thyroid hormone into the active form your body needs.
  • Re-activate your primary detoxification pathway so you can detoxify your many thyroid suppressive hormones and toxins.
  • De-activate your stress response that’s suppressing your thyroid.
  • And the list goes on and on…

(By the way, I talk more about how to correct your underlying liver issues that are preventing you from healing in this post about “How to Heal Your Thyroid By Healing Your Liver”)

First, let’s talk about another major part of your Thyroid Hormone Pathway that we need to fix.

2. We Unblock Your Thyroid Gland

OK, this is the most obvious part of the pathway but it’s still very important.

The common myth today is that hypothyroidism is a result of a sluggish thyroid gland.

But why exactly does your thyroid gland become sluggish in the first place?

Maybe someone added a little too much chlorine to your gene pool?

Or maybe there’s a little more to this story than you might realize.

You might be surprised to learn that your thyroid gland can actually become blocked in multiple ways.

It can become blocked from both producing and releasing thyroid hormone, which we see all the time.

When it comes to unblocking your thyroid gland, there a number of things that we need to fix as well…

  • Balance the proteins in your diet to activate the enzymes that produce thyroid hormone inside your thyroid gland.
  • Balance your estrogen and progesterone to activate the enzymes that allow your thyroid gland to release its thyroid hormone into your bloodstream.

Even chronic stress itself will slow down the production of thyroid hormone at your thyroid gland.

Oftentimes these issues can be quite evident when looking at thyroid labs.

While producing and getting thyroid hormone into your bloodstream is vital, this next part might just be the most overlooked.

3. We Unblock Your Thyroid Hormone Carrier Proteins

Every day we depend on cars, bikes, buses, etc. to take us from where we are to where we need to be.

But what happens when someone steals your car or bike, or the bus you want to take is full?

You’re left stranded.

The same goes for your thyroid hormone.

You depend on carrier proteins in your bloodstream to pick up and carry your thyroid hormone to your cells.

But when these carrier proteins become blocked, you’re thyroid hormone is left stranded and your cells weak and starving.

And if you can’t get thyroid hormone to your cells, then you’ll always be hypothyroid.

When it comes to unblocking your carrier proteins, we have to…

  • Ensure that there are adequate carrier proteins available to deliver your thyroid hormone to your cells.
  • Detoxify the fatty acids in your bloodstream that are tying up and taking over your carrier proteins.

It’s the little and oftentimes overlooked things that prevent us from seeing the results we want and deserve with our health… which is why we cover thyroid health in so much detail, like you’ll see in the 3 Food Triple-Thyroid-Boosting Daily Protocol.

The Simple 3 Food Triple Thyroid-Boosting Daily Protocol

You can get all the details about this triple-thyroid-boosting protocol right here.

So, that covers the first three parts of your Thyroid Hormone Pathway that we must address to ensure that you’re getting your thyroid hormone to your cells.

But remember, your cells still have to be able to metabolize it properly for healthy thyroid function.

And that’s what we’ll be focusing on in these final two parts.

4. We Unblock Your Thyroid Hormone Cell Receptors

Getting thyroid hormone to your cells is hard enough.

But you’re still not out of the woods yet.

Your thyroid hormone still has to bind to your cells in order for your cells to use it.

And for many people, finding a receptor site for your thyroid hormone to bind to is like trying to find a parking spot at Whole Foods right before dinner time.

It’s just not going to happen.

To unblock your cell receptors and make enough room for your thyroid hormone, there are even more things that we have to fix…

  • Down-regulate your reverse T3 hormone that’s overtaking your cell receptors.
  • Detoxify the toxic fats that are also crowding your cell receptors.
  • Use healthy fats in your diet to increase your number of cell receptors and improve thyroid hormone binding capacity.

Now we’re getting close, but there’s still one major hurdle that we have to overcome.

5. We Unblock Your Metabolism

Most hypothyroidism sufferers understand that they have a slow or dysfunctional metabolism.

But if you think that exercise is going to change that, you might just have to learn this the hard way like most do.

For most, exercising with hypothyroidism is like trying to keep warm by lighting your house on fire.

It might keep you warm for a while but at what cost?

Eventually, it’s all going to come crashing down on you.

What we have to do is get your body using the right source of fuel.

And get your metabolism in high gear while you’re at rest… 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

To unblock your metabolism like this we have to create an environment where you cells can thrive, which we do by…

  • Eliminating the large amounts of free fatty acids in your bloodstream that prevent your cells from metabolizing thyroid hormone.
  • Detoxify the thyroid suppressive hormones that are suffocating your cells.
  • Properly balance your diet so that your cells have a consistent source of the right fuel they need to produce endless energy.
  • Detoxify the high levels of lactic acid inherent with hypothyroidism that perpetuate dysfunctional hypothyroid metabolism.

I talk more about the importance of balancing your diet in this post about the dangers of low-carb diets.

You see, there’s a lot more to restoring your thyroid health than most realize.

But that doesn’t mean it has to be difficult by any means.

That’s why we’ve taken this complete and comprehensive approach and broken it down into a simple step-by-step formula.

That’s how we help our clients overcome their thyroid issues for good.

Overcoming Your Hypothyroidism Is So Much Better Than Trying to Live With It

Here’s why this systematic approach works so well.

  • You fix every underlying cause of your thyroid issue… you just need to properly address every part of your Thyroid Hormone Pathway.
  • You put an end to the continuous hypothyroid cycle that you’re trapped in… instead of watching it worsen to the point that it becomes unbearable.
  • You’ll correct the underlying issues responsible for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis… even if you’re not sure if you have it.
  • You’ll regain control of your health and can and live without limitations… which is something that most only dream about.
  • You don’t have to be a medical student to follow it… in fact the less misinformation you’ve been exposed to the better.

There are a lot of books and advice out there that focus on a single aspect of thyroid health. And others that help you make the best of a life limited by thyroid issues.

But this daily protocol shows you how to start to start getting real results. It’s a super simple way to start every day right and full of energy.

Click here to get started with your 3 Food Triple-Thyroid-Boosting Daily Protocol.

About the Author:

Tom Brimeyer is the founder of Forefront Health and the creator of the popular Hypothyroidism Revolution program series. Specializing in thyroid and metabolism disorders, Tom's work has impacted over 50,000 people spanning more than 60 countries. Tom is also a highly sought after practitioner who runs a successful health consulting practice where he continues to help clients across the globe to take back control of their lives from their devastating health conditions.

166 Comments

  1. suklasree mitra July 16, 2015 at 8:53 pm - Reply

    This is very useful newsletter for hypothyroidism . I want to know what edible oils I should take for my hypothyroidism . Let me know much more for diets for it . How to detoxify the liver because my liver function is not responding correctly . Loose motions occurs often and sleeplessness and insomnia is the most acute problem in my life .

    • Tom Brimeyer July 17, 2015 at 8:01 am - Reply

      Detoxifying the liver as most think of it is a but of a misnomer. The best thing to do for your liver is to support it with the right nutrition it needs to function properly and that will improve its ability to detoxify. The insomnia itself has a lot to do with this and regulating blood sugar. When you become hypothyroid, your body compensates by over-activating the stress response.

  2. Terri Frebis July 18, 2015 at 8:57 am - Reply

    Tom, my thyroid stopped working after pregnancy. When I was first diagnosed, my TSH LEVEL WAS 143. I was told I would be on thyroid medication the rest of my life. How do you find the underlying cause for that? Is it able to be fixed?

    • Tom Brimeyer July 19, 2015 at 6:44 am - Reply

      This is extremely common and has to do with hormonal fluctuations following pregnancy/breastfeeding. Particularly when estrogen levels rise and there’s not adequate progesterone to balance. Estrogen itself inhibits the proteolytic enzymes that allow the thyroid gland to release thyroid hormone into the bloodstream.

  3. carmen green July 20, 2015 at 11:12 pm - Reply

    Really interested in finding outmore on hyper thyrhoidism jus found out i might b a candidate dropping weght weekly weght loss is a sign alot of my relatives suffer from this my dad has been taking meds for this condition for 20something yrs so yes im cobcerned and a lil scar

  4. Jennifer Hopkins July 24, 2015 at 3:54 pm - Reply

    Will this help if you are hypothyroid due to thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer?

    • Tom Brimeyer July 24, 2015 at 3:59 pm - Reply

      The short answer is yes. The only difference is that you will need to supplement thyroid hormone to the degree that you cannot produce it. However, it’s important to understand that just because you take thyroid hormone doesn’t mean that the hormone is getting to your cells. Thyroid hormone can get blocked many places along this pathway as discussed in this article.

      For example, most hypothyroid people can’t convert inactive T4 thyroid hormone to active T3 thyroid hormone that your cells need. Thyroid hormone can also get blocked in the bloodstream, at the cell receptor, etc. You can supplement all of the thyroid hormone you want but if you can’t get the hormone to your cells then you will still be hypothyroid.

      • Shewanna August 29, 2015 at 10:23 am - Reply

        Hi Josh
        This sounds alike like my problem. What can or should I take to balance my Thyroid. I have increased and decreased medicines. I have taken different types for medicine and still have not reached a balance. Could their be something else wrong that is not dealing with my thyroid. I’m 34 years old and been battling with hypothyroidism for years now on trying to finding a right balance. On some days I feel like I’m 80 years old not able to move due to no energy.

  5. Luella Hiatt July 26, 2015 at 7:33 pm - Reply

    I don’t have a thyroid it was removed because of cancer. My medications go up and down. Currently on Synthroid 112mcg. daily then the next month it could be 200mcg.Some days I’m so exhausted I wish I could just lay down and never get out of bed. I have a job that I truly love work up to 50 hours a weeek. What can I do to not be so tired?

    • Anita July 27, 2015 at 11:35 am - Reply

      Hi Luella,
      I’m in a similar situation to you, although my thyroid was removed not because of cancer, but because of enlargement and nodules and cysts.
      Some days I’m so exhausted I feel myself bending over in half and nearly staying there!
      I work 35 hours a week on my feet, with an hour and a half journey travelling at the beginning and the end of each day.
      I take my tablet first thing in the morning on an empty stomach, and only sip hot water afterwards.
      I wait one hour and then I have a huge cup of coffee and a non dairy breakfast such as an omelette or a sandwich. (Dairy will line your stomach and prevent your meds getting through.)
      After lunch I take vitamins A, B Complex, C, D and E, Calcium, Evening Primrose Oil, Magnesium, Selenium, Zinc and Korean Ginseng. They keep me going and get me through the afternoon. After looking at this article I might take a look at Milk Thistle for cleansing the liver.
      (I do love a glass of red wine in the evening!)
      I was really run down earlier this year and was catching every viral illness and cold out there.
      I take Echinacea now and was advised by a nurse to increase my Vitamin D. So I take it in tablet form, and even though I’m not a sun worshipper, I try and get the 20 minutes daily if I can. I’m in the UK so where we are in the hemisphere, we don’t get a lot of sunshine. 2 Months worth max!
      Wishing you the very best of luck.
      Anita x

  6. charla July 31, 2015 at 5:50 pm - Reply

    I have Graves disease and radiated my thyroid back in 2002. I am wondering how and if I can heal my thyroid, if I don’t actually have a thyroid? I take 225 levothroxyine , my doctors won’t even run the other tests, I feel miserable , like I am dying every single day. I need help but I feel I am beyond it.

    • David April 11, 2016 at 8:08 pm - Reply

      Levothyroxine never worked for me. You should switch to a desiccated thyroid product like Nature Thyroid, and keep increasing the dose until your symptoms go away.

      • Kim June 8, 2016 at 7:04 pm - Reply

        Are they selling NatureThroid again? I ran out in Jan and couldn’t get it at the health food store anymore. The FDA forced them to stop distributing it because of sourcing issues.

        • margaret October 27, 2016 at 7:57 am - Reply

          Hi, I take Nature-Throid. It is a dissicated thyroid distributed by RLC labs and is by prescription. It is not sold over the counter in Health Food Stores. It is almost identical to Armour Thyroid but a better price point. No problem with getting it. Don’t know where you got the story about FDA problems. I have been taking it for a number of years. After years of trying one thing and another to “feel good again”,NatureThroid seemed to work best for me. The doc and I tried different doses over a period of time until I felt good. Sorry if you are having a problem getting it. Check with your doc.

    • nelly August 2, 2016 at 10:28 pm - Reply

      hello my name is nelly i got my tyroyd removed on 2000 i felt like u i want able to splain how tierd i felt i use to take levoxinol same as u i was so bad my hair felt oll the time and i felt kike i was 80 ma mom had more enegy then me i found a doctor tha give me biodentical hormones the same that my body use to make it been a lot beter for me tell u doctor is call ell is alot better then man made drugs

  7. lisa July 31, 2015 at 7:56 pm - Reply

    Hi I had half my thyroid removed I take 88 milgram of levothyrxin I work 55 hours a week tell me this please my feet is like needles sticking the bottom is that thyroid related I did take chestrol pills but I am eating healthy finally started losing weight blood pressure is doing great My feet is really painful to walk I dont understand many thanks

    • APRIL HARGER April 11, 2016 at 3:14 pm - Reply

      My feet get tender like that and very painful to walk on when i eat gluten. After going a couple days without it again the pain goes away. Maybe this can help you, I hope also.

      • Vickie wheeler July 27, 2016 at 5:24 am - Reply

        I also have much pain in my feet when I have foods with gluten.

  8. Laurel August 5, 2015 at 9:31 pm - Reply

    Hi. I have been wondering for years if there is any way to improve the areas effected by a thyroid gland – esp. Metabolism if one has had thyroid cancer and the gland has been completely removed ? Or are we just spinning our wheels here – does our synthetic thyroid replacement do what it can and we have to be satisfied with it?

  9. lee August 13, 2015 at 7:23 am - Reply

    im having my thyroid treated by naturopaths and have done the last 10 months … definite improvement .. I have just had my first acupuncture session to reboot my adrenals .. they are actually more concerned about my kidneys … feeling amazing after my first session

  10. Karen August 19, 2015 at 8:51 pm - Reply

    I have struggled for ten years after rai for hashimotos and graves. Anxiety,panic attacks, dizzy off balance feeling and little to no energy. Will this help me since my thyroid doesn’t work? I take natural desicated thyroid(armour) three times a day.

  11. Tina August 23, 2015 at 10:38 am - Reply

    I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s about 3 years after my son was born. I nursed for 2/12 years. I have been on a dose of synthroid daily for 15 years. I have searched for a solution to get off this medication to no avail. Your program sounds amazing and I’m wondering would it help me accomplish this goal? Thanks!

  12. DP August 24, 2015 at 6:31 pm - Reply

    Can I use this protocol safely while breastfeeding?

    • Tom Brimeyer August 25, 2015 at 10:10 am - Reply

      That shouldn’t be a problem.

  13. stacey September 4, 2015 at 11:46 pm - Reply

    I had a complete thyrodectomy will this work the same for me…been on synthroid for 5 yrs was just switched to lithryronine

    • Tom Brimeyer September 5, 2015 at 8:59 am - Reply

      Hi Stacey, here’s my answer to Luella below, which applies to you as well…

      “The short answer is yes. The only difference is that you will need to supplement thyroid hormone to the degree that you cannot produce it. However, it’s important to understand that just because you take thyroid hormone doesn’t mean that the hormone is getting to your cells. Thyroid hormone can get blocked many places along this pathway as discussed in this article.

      For example, most hypothyroid people can’t convert inactive T4 thyroid hormone to active T3 thyroid hormone that your cells need. Thyroid hormone can also get blocked in the bloodstream, at the cell receptor, etc. You can supplement all of the thyroid hormone you want but if you can’t get the hormone to your cells then you will still be hypothyroid.”

  14. Patricia Toseland September 9, 2015 at 1:45 pm - Reply

    Do you recommend armour as its mentioned a lot on American sites but I don’t know if it’s available in UK xx

  15. Stacey September 17, 2015 at 9:53 am - Reply

    Tom
    I read all these articles on how to feel better with hypothroid but none off them talk about people that have had thyroid cancer! Do all off these fix work the same for people who have no thyroid but have all these symptoms!??

    • Tom Brimeyer September 17, 2015 at 9:58 am - Reply

      Hi Stacey, Luella and another Stacey asked a similar question and my response applies to you as well…

      “The short answer is yes. The only difference is that you will need to supplement thyroid hormone to the degree that you cannot produce it. However, it’s important to understand that just because you take thyroid hormone doesn’t mean that the hormone is getting to your cells. Thyroid hormone can get blocked many places along this pathway as discussed in this article.

      For example, most hypothyroid people can’t convert inactive T4 thyroid hormone to active T3 thyroid hormone that your cells need. Thyroid hormone can also get blocked in the bloodstream, at the cell receptor, etc. You can supplement all of the thyroid hormone you want but if you can’t get the hormone to your cells then you will still be hypothyroid.”

  16. Connie September 20, 2015 at 6:55 pm - Reply

    Years ago I was told by my specialist that my thyroid was swollen but not cancerous and that just to be on the safe side I should let him remove the swollen lobe that the other lobe would take over for the missing one….At the time personal computers were not invented so I had no way of researching what he was telling me. I went ahead and trusted him because he was a physician and had more education than I did, right? Well, I have regretted that decision …..I don’t routinely go to doctors, I don’t trust them because of one story after another from family, friends, blogs, etc that have told their own horror stories….I believe emergency medicine is deserving of respect but I have seen too much and experienced much myself to put them back on the pedestal I had them on. I now know they are only human who make mistakes….my question is how to help my remaining thyroid gland to do it’s very best. I am not on any meds whatsoever. I am overweight and want to loose weight asap and feel I need a boost of energy from time to time…I do take Ubiquenol, a form of CoQ10, a raw multi vitamin, fish oil, and several other supplements. What suggestions could you give to those like me with only one thyroid lobe? Another questionis actually for my husband…He had graves disease and his doctor had him take radioactive iodine. He is on synthroid but I was wondering if there have been any cases where their thyroids would regenerate and what else could be done beside take synthroid? Thank you for your time in answering my questions.

  17. shirley jankowski September 28, 2015 at 10:38 pm - Reply

    When I was diagnosed in January my TSH was 395. I was suffering from congestive heart failure, plural effusion, myxoderm coma, high blood pressure, and severe adema. I was hospitalized for 12 days. They removed 550mls of fluid from my pericardium, with an additional 150 mls through a drain the following day. Iweighrd 187# when I went into the hospital. I lost 67 pounds of fluid while in the hospital down to 119 after I got home I am now gaining the fluid back. I’m back over 140# again and sleeping sitting in a chair so I can breathe. I’m so tired all the time. I don’t dare sit down for fear of falling asleep.

  18. Patti September 29, 2015 at 10:58 pm - Reply

    Is my hypothyroidism the probable cause of these heart palpitations I keep experiencing? I’ve felt like this for at least ten years but only got diagnosed with hypothyroidism about 3 years ago.

    • Tom Brimeyer September 30, 2015 at 8:53 am - Reply

      The heart palpitations are commonly found with those who compensate for their hypothyroidism with high levels of adrenaline.

      • Patti September 30, 2015 at 1:32 pm - Reply

        I’ve been tested by ecg or ekg or whatever it is that they put those monitors all over your body, even your legs. Whatever that test was for- it came up negative. So they said I needed to get a holter monitor. I increased my levels of potassium, magnesium and other minerals and they slowed A LOT. I went off my Armour thyroid medicine about 2 months ago and now the palpitations are back daily!

  19. Patti September 30, 2015 at 1:37 pm - Reply

    Just one more question – if my adrenaline is high then why can’t I lose any weight? ?

  20. grainne October 4, 2015 at 2:23 pm - Reply

    I am on 125mg of levothyroxine since the borth of my son 4 years ago. I have now been diagnosed with gestational diabetes – is there any link? I was given metaformin to help with the diabetes but felt it counter-acted with the thyroxine. am now on insulin injections – doctor said there was no link but mood symptoms returned. what advice what you give?

  21. Mary S October 6, 2015 at 3:07 pm - Reply

    OK, I understand with this program, ,more thyroid hormone would be getting into my cells,Seeing I am hypothyroid due to Hashimotos, would the antithyroid antibodies still be circulating in my blood, thus continuing the need for levothyroxine… or would following this approach possibly also attack the cause of the autoimmunity?The way I read it, there will still be a need for supplementation but it would all just work better with this program and I would probably feel better?As there are so many schools of thought on what actually caiuses autoimmune issues… could I think,perhaps declogging the liver and reducing inflammation could possibly help reduce the antibodies???

    • Tom Brimeyer October 7, 2015 at 12:01 pm - Reply

      Hashimoto’s is hypothyroidism but with an immune component. The short answer is yes, the HR Program does cover Hashimoto’s as it is a major form of hypothyroidism today.

      There are a few issues with Hashimoto’s that need to be addressed. There’s an issue of metabolic dysfunction that occurs with hypothyroidism where your cells end up taking up excessive calcium and estrogen becomes excessive.

      The estrogen blocks the proteolytic enzymes that allow the thyroid gland to release its thyroid hormone, driving the hypothyroid aspect. Estrogen and stress hormone are both well known for causing involution or damage to the thymus gland. The thymus gland sits right behind your breast bone and regulates your immune system. So, damage to the thymus gland affects immune function. Studies have also shown that elevated estrogen increases the production of autoimmune antibodies.

      Regulating estrogen and stress hormone are two big pieces of the puzzle, but there is more to it than just that.

      • sean burke January 8, 2016 at 10:48 am - Reply

        i have hoshimotos disease. how come doctors do not check your estrogen levels if that is the main cause for the immune system creating autoimmune antibodies?
        how can I get better help?

        • Tom Brimeyer January 11, 2016 at 8:14 am - Reply

          Dr. Broda Barnes’ research directly connected hypothyroidism and heart disease without question. Why doesn’t medicine check thyroid levels for heart disease? Why does medicine continue to prescribe PUFA oils as “heart healthy” when lots of research shows that they increase the risk of heart disease? There are many shortfalls in medicine unfortunately.

          Also because estrogen cannot be accurately measured by a blood lab as it tends to accumulate in tissue and not the blood.

  22. Lindsay October 8, 2015 at 11:02 pm - Reply

    Why can’t I lose weight even though my thyroid levels are in the normal range?? I was on 75mg levothyroxine after the birth of my last child 2 years ago. My doctor dropped me down to 50 mg, 5 months after my child was born. My numbers are in the “normal” range but can’t lose weight. My weight seem stalled. What am I doing wrong??

    • Tom Brimeyer October 9, 2015 at 7:27 am - Reply

      Lindsay, that’s exactly what we’re talking about in this article. I work with quite a few clients with a “normal” full thyroid panel yet they are very hypothyroid still. As I always say, it doesn’t matter how much thyroid hormone you have in your bloodstream. If you can’t get that thyroid hormone to your cells or your cells can’t use it, it won’t matter. You’ll still be hypothyroid.

  23. Hun October 11, 2015 at 8:17 am - Reply

    Hi Tom,
    When I was pregnant with my son I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism but doctors waited until my delivery to put me on medicine.After delivery they gave me medicine for hyperthyroidism for two years,when it was still not under control doctor gave me nuclear iodine. After since than I have hypothyroidism. It’s been 10 years now,i tried to get pregnant but no success.i gained 20 lbs each year and I m only 31 years old.
    I am in need of serious help.its effecting my health n relationships as I cry at times and laugh at other times.my son wants kids

  24. Linda October 17, 2015 at 6:40 am - Reply

    Hi Tom,
    Just found your site !!! ?….I am a mess. Hashimotos at age 19,
    I have several nodules, and a large goiter, Have been on a
    thyroid medicine of some kind since then. 45 years ago.
    Very prevalent in my midwest family. I also was very ill with a
    staph meningatis, encephalitis. In a 5 day coma. I woke up with
    complete amnesia. Since, 22 years ago, I have developed,
    Fibromyalgia, Epstine Barr Virus, Prenicous Anemia,Insulin
    Resistant, Chronic Fatigue, Bipolar 1, Panic/Anxiety, Chronic pain issues. Gerd, High cholesterol, Arthritis…….Am on 11 RX
    meds a day…… I am desperate. I have over studied this sibject.
    I am now taking 120 mg of armour twice a day. 25 mcg of cytomel teice a day. I keep reading about all the adrenal fatigue.
    Cortisol issues. I am soooo confused. I need blood work, not
    sure what to have to be through, also a saliva test. I had HPylori
    so I am being tested for that, had high calcium. I take several
    supplememts, high dose vit. D, milk thistle, turmeric, Alphs Lipoic acid, Calcium, CoQ 10, I heard I need Vit. C, and Magnesium as well. Will this work for me ? With what I am on
    noe, in addition ? Or start over. Do I need Bloodwork first.
    Will this help my adrenal fatigue. Or how do I know about the
    hormone issues ? I am going between doctors. New pcps do I
    need to go to a endroconologist ? Can this program help or
    hurt. Will my large doses of psych. drugs affect me ? I also
    am suppose to have B-12 or BComplex 2-4 times a month. I
    have not been able to afford the serum vials, the prices have
    jumped from $45.00 to $300.00 in under a year. I know the B-12
    deficiency is a HUGE DEAL….. I am also having an issue with the huge price rise in Armour Thyroid. Is a generic ok ?
    Sorry, I told you I was a mess. Should I do blood work before
    starting ? THANKS ????

  25. Richard October 19, 2015 at 8:03 pm - Reply

    So many questions? I have been living without a thyroid due to a goiter irradition since 1967. I take 300 mcg daily, except when Drs try to reinvent the wheel. I also played just about every sport possible plus 20 + years in the military led to multiple injuries. Because Drs don’t want to prescribe pain meds I have taken Tylenol almost daily for almost 30 years. Now taking 1950mg at least twice daily. How does this affect the healing of my liver?

    • Tom Brimeyer October 20, 2015 at 10:21 am - Reply

      Hi Richard, in general aspirin is safer than Tylenol and I always recommend using vitamin K anytime aspirin is used longer term to prevent the potential for blood thinning. Dr. Raymond Peat mentions that caffeine/coffee is also helpful in protecting the liver from acetaminophen (Tylenol).

  26. reneeszabo November 4, 2015 at 7:24 am - Reply

    In the past 3 years I have diagnosed with cll and thyroid problem I take 75 MG of levothyroxin.also focal seizures. My question is can low thyroid problems be part of my seizures? my seizures happen once a month at the same time I used to have my periods. My dr says no thyroid has nothing to do with it. But when I was younger at that time of month I used to get migraine headaches. Iam 62 and ended periods at 47 no problem. But now I started hot flashes and seizures. Thank you renee

    • Tom Brimeyer November 4, 2015 at 8:08 am - Reply

      Short answer yes. This is something that Dr. Raymond Peat has discussed in detail. Hypothyroidism leads to the over-activation of the stress response, sodium wasting, elevated estrogen, glucose deficiency, etc. The combination of the estrogen dominance and sodium loss makes you more susceptible to seizures. Oftentimes they are triggered more in the evening when blood sugar tends to be lower.

      And that’s great that you’ve correlated it with your menstrual cycle because that plays a big role due to the fluctuations of estrogen and progesterone during your cycle. During menstruation progesterone drops significantly, creating such an environment prone to seizures. Migraines are also correlated with seizures so it’s likely that this is the same issue that has become more severe.

  27. Debra Couch November 5, 2015 at 9:59 pm - Reply

    I drank radioactive iodine..I was told that it would kill my thyroid and take levothyroxine to replace it. It did not kill my thyroid it functions terrible and my body feels like it just wants to stop sometimes..I’m lost

  28. Sharon November 6, 2015 at 8:09 pm - Reply

    Why not just try taking Himalayan sea salt? See if it helps you!

  29. Kerry wood November 7, 2015 at 9:36 am - Reply

    Thank you so much for this very helpful information.

  30. Kecia haas November 7, 2015 at 6:31 pm - Reply

    Do you see patients? If so where are you located? The more med I take the higher my numbers . My tsh is 49 and t3, T4 and rt3 are crazy also. I’ve seen 15 endocrinologist. I need help. I haven’t felt good in 10 years.

    • Tom Brimeyer November 9, 2015 at 11:30 am - Reply

      I do offer consulting services and location is not a problem since it is typically done by phone. If you’re interested, please contact support@forefronthealth. Your TSH is quite high and given the amount of inflammation from that alone you would likely feel quite bad.

  31. Michelle November 8, 2015 at 6:30 pm - Reply

    I have auto-immune hypothyroidism, along with auto-immune Type 1 diabetes & celiac disease. Will your system work for me?

    • Tom Brimeyer November 9, 2015 at 11:34 am - Reply

      Yes it will and we do provide coaching with the HR Program so this is something that I would ask specifically through the coaching. The program is 100% gluten free and we address Hashimoto’s/autoimmune hypothyroidism. We also address the diabetic aspect because diabetes itself will make you functionally hypothyroid. And it’s important to understand how to address this properly.

  32. Sally November 13, 2015 at 1:58 pm - Reply

    I have Grave’s Disease. I was “off the charts” hyperthyroidism. Thyroid was destroyed with RAI. Has been 13 years…labs are always up and down…I would love to feel normal again.
    Would this pertain to me?

    • Tom Brimeyer November 17, 2015 at 9:51 am - Reply

      What you have and are experiencing is common with estrogen dominance, particularly labs that fluctuate due to the loading and unloading of the thyroid gland.

      The short answer is yes, everything we teach still applies 100%. The only difference is that you will need to supplement thyroid hormone to the degree that you cannot produce it. However, it’s important to understand that just because you take thyroid hormone doesn’t mean that the hormone is getting to your cells. Thyroid hormone can get blocked many places along this pathway. For example, most hypothyroid people can’t convert inactive T4 thyroid hormone to active T3 thyroid hormone that your cells need. Thyroid hormone can also get blocked in the bloodstream, at the cell receptor, etc. You can supplement all of the thyroid hormone you want but if you can’t get the hormone to your cells then you will still be hypothyroid.

      We focus on all facets of the thyroid. You can learn a little more about this here: http://www.forefronthealth.com/overcome-hypothyroidism/

  33. Yolanda November 22, 2015 at 2:47 pm - Reply

    The least I know the better? I read the whole thing almost convinced until that last line.

    • Tom Brimeyer November 23, 2015 at 9:25 am - Reply

      Hi Yolanda, what we do is very different from the medical approach and one of the biggest issues that I find with clients is that they’ve been reading so much misinformation out there that we have to completely re-educate them from the ground up. So the less misinformation you’ve been exposed to the better.

  34. Rebecca December 3, 2015 at 7:47 pm - Reply

    Does your approach help those who had RAI therapy and no longer have a functioning thyroid?

    • Tom Brimeyer December 4, 2015 at 9:17 am - Reply

      Hi Rebecca, The short answer is yes, everything we teach still applies 100%. The only difference is that you will need to supplement thyroid hormone to the degree that you cannot produce it. However, it’s important to understand that just because you take thyroid hormone doesn’t mean that the hormone is getting to your cells. Thyroid hormone can get blocked many places along this pathway. For example, most hypothyroid people can’t convert inactive T4 thyroid hormone to active T3 thyroid hormone that your cells need. Thyroid hormone can also get blocked in the bloodstream, at the cell receptor, etc. You can supplement all of the thyroid hormone you want but if you can’t get the hormone to your cells then you will still be hypothyroid. This is why we focus on all aspects of thyroid health.

  35. Ivona December 3, 2015 at 9:15 pm - Reply

    Hi, I have question.My TSH is 0,67. T4 is 20. T3 is 5. Thyroperoxidase <10. Thyroglobulin very HI -441
    Vit D-79. Adrenal Function – Cortisol- 456. Why Thyroglobulin is very hi? Ivona

  36. cas December 4, 2015 at 9:14 am - Reply

    Hi Tom, my TSH is around 10. My GP is desperate for me to take the medication but I won’t take it. I wanted to do some alternative therapies first. Do you think it can be stabilised or returned to normal without taking levothyroxine? Thank you.

    • Tom Brimeyer December 4, 2015 at 9:23 am - Reply

      Hi Cas, in the UK you’re more limited to what is available which makes it a bit more difficult. A TSH of 10 is quite high and can result in significant inflammation and symptoms as TSH is an inflammatory hormone. Whether or not you can do it without medication depends on a number of variables. I would recommend educating yourself and reading this comprehensive article on thyroid medications: http://www.forefronthealth.com/thyroid-medication/

  37. Brenda December 10, 2015 at 6:18 pm - Reply

    How do u help if the radiation destroyed the thyroids ? What test do I need to do?

    • Tom Brimeyer December 11, 2015 at 1:35 pm - Reply

      Hi Brenda, I’m assuming you’re currently being medicated although it’s very important in your case to be using desiccated thyroid or something that contains both T3 and T4 in the proper ratios that match what your thyroid gland would naturally produce.

      As for tests, a full thyroid panel would still be important which can help indicate where along your thyroid hormone pathway things are going wrong. And it’s important to understand that just because you take thyroid hormone doesn’t mean that the hormone is getting to your cells. Thyroid hormone can get blocked many places along this pathway. For example, most hypothyroid people can’t convert inactive T4 thyroid hormone to active T3 thyroid hormone that your cells need. Thyroid hormone can also get blocked in the bloodstream, at the cell receptor, etc. You can supplement all of the thyroid hormone you want but if you can’t get the hormone to your cells then you will still be hypothyroid.

      This is why we focus on all facets of the thyroid health.

  38. Karen cox December 13, 2015 at 7:50 am - Reply

    Interesting that you talk about liver health and hypothyroisim. I was dx’d 3 yrs ago with Hashimoto’s at the same time I was being tx for hep C with Pegasus interferon, incevik and riboviran.

  39. Connie December 18, 2015 at 12:25 pm - Reply

    Dear Mr Brimeyer……Thank you for taking the time to answer a few questions…..I think there are a lot of folks with the same issues I mention here and would like to hear your answers…I had asked this in September but no reply as yet so I am hoping you will have the time to do so now…thank you so much….Kind Regards…..

    Years ago I was told by my specialist that my thyroid was swollen but not cancerous and that just to be on the safe side I should let him remove the swollen lobe that the other lobe would take over for the missing one….At the time personal computers were not invented so I had no way of researching what he was telling me. I went ahead and trusted him because he was a physician and had more education than I did, right? Well, I have regretted that decision …..I don’t routinely go to doctors, I don’t trust them because of one story after another from family, friends, blogs, etc that have told their own horror stories….I believe emergency medicine is deserving of respect but I have seen too much and experienced much myself to put them back on the pedestal I had them on. I now know they are only human who make mistakes….my question is how to help my remaining thyroid gland to do it’s very best. I am not on any meds whatsoever. I am overweight and want to loose weight asap and feel I need a boost of energy from time to time…I do take Ubiquenol, a form of CoQ10 which helps alot, a raw multi vitamin, fish oil, and several other supplements. What suggestions could you give to those like me with only one thyroid lobe? Another questionis actually for my husband…He had graves disease and his doctor had him take radioactive iodine. He is on synthroid but I was wondering if there have been any cases where their thyroids would regenerate and what else could be done beside take synthroid? Thank you for your time in answering my questions……Kind Regards…Connie

    • Tom Brimeyer December 21, 2015 at 11:44 am - Reply

      Hi Connie, the short answer is yes, everything we teach still applies 100%. The only difference is that you will need to supplement thyroid hormone to the degree that you cannot produce it.

      However, it’s important to understand that just because you take thyroid hormone doesn’t mean that the hormone is getting to your cells. Thyroid hormone can get blocked many places along this pathway.

      For example, most hypothyroid people can’t convert inactive T4 thyroid hormone to active T3 thyroid hormone that your cells need. Thyroid hormone can also get blocked in the bloodstream, at the cell receptor, etc.

      You can supplement all of the thyroid hormone you want but if you can’t get the hormone to your cells then you will still be hypothyroid.

      As for thyroid regeneration, there have been a few stem cell studies but we’re a very far away from that being a viable option at the moment.

  40. Olivia Wallace January 8, 2016 at 10:04 am - Reply

    I would like to know if you have an office so I could come see you? ? If not do you have phone consults? What state are you located at also?
    I love getting educated about my health, want to learn what is necessary for me to be healthy and well.
    Thank you,
    ~Olivia~

    • Tom Brimeyer January 11, 2016 at 8:16 am - Reply

      Hi Olivia, I work with clients from all over the world. So, I work almost exclusively by phone these days. And we are located in Colorado.

  41. Catherine Pabon January 8, 2016 at 1:22 pm - Reply

    I have had a LONG hard road with hypothyroid and Hashimoto’s. I have diligently and strictly followed so many “plans” and “protocols” through the years. I said all that as a disclaimer that this is different. I’m two weeks exactly today following this plan and it is different than anything I’ve ever done. My experience so far has been amazing. I initially purchased the $7 meal plan with recipes. I was able to start that immediately because my mother had literally just the week before sent me three packages of the collagen gelatin protein that goes into several things. Anyway, it’s now two weeks later and last night I bought the whole package so I could have everything because I’m so thrilled with how my body is responding already. I don’t make any money off of anything, I’m just sharing all that with you so you know that I haven’t been doing it long enough to give some amazing testimonial, but so far I’m EXTREMELY pleased with several areas of my health that I’ve suffered with through the years of being “right” in my blood work but never right at all with all the symptoms. I’m classic for his descriptions. Here’s the first article I read and he has short videos, too. http://www.forefronthealth.com/overcome-hypothyroidism/

  42. Bonnie January 12, 2016 at 5:54 am - Reply

    Hi, i have read your page here and it all sounds great. Well from whay i can recall, my thyroid issue i think is beyond repair. I do not recall to much anymore. My memory is that of a 90 year old with dementia it is horrible. I am 37 and feel like i am dying a slow torturous death. They told me when they took my thyroid out i would need a pill everyday and that would be it. My thyroid was so overactive and not responding to meds that it almost killed me and my child i was pregnant with at the time. He ended up being born the day i was set to have my thyroid removed, at 28 weeks so 12 weeks early and 1lb 13 ounzes (he is 14 now). I had him by c-section and wisked off to have my thyroid removed right after. Thats how dangerous it was then. 3 months in the hospital before he was born as my heart beat was 226 beats a min and we both should have died that day. So having so many issue hyperthyroid i was game for having it removed and only needing a pill a day for life to have a better one. Wow that was a lie…… a better life not so much. It has been 14 years of hell and i see no end to it. Frustrated in Canada. My thoughts are everywhere as i can not stick to one topic or subject. I am always all over the place . The worst part is no one in my life understands. I look great therefore i must feel great. Grrrrrrr. My looking good days are few and far between now. Happens when you get depressed i think.

  43. Marie January 17, 2016 at 5:09 pm - Reply

    I have been sick with hypothyroidism/ hashimotos after I had my daughter almost 4 years ago. I found a holistic doctor because my endocrinologist put me on levothyroxin.and it caused me to o crazy, hurt real bd, gain more weight and depression so bad I felt suicidal. This holistic doctor said I can’t covert t4 into t3 which is why that was happening. She now has me on 170 mg of nature thyroid and 20 mg of cytomel. I still hurt, still have brain fog real bad. Still can’t sleep well. I’ve been on every diet you mentioned and nothing helps. I take tons of supplements including milk thistle for my liver and gall bladder. I’ve been having pain under my right rib cage for years but never had anything diagnosed. If I don’t take the milk thistle I hurt, if I do, I don’t . I did have an ultrasound done on my gall bladder and no stones. I had the same symptoms when I had my boys many years ago but they went away after like 3 years and came back with a vengeance after I had my daughter. This time it didn’t go away.

    • Tom Brimeyer January 18, 2016 at 9:14 am - Reply

      Hi Marie,

      I’m not sure what you mean by “I’ve been on every diet you mentioned” because we only recommend one diet, which is the one we use. With that said, we also have articles that can help answer some of your questions and concerns such as…

      4 Simple Fixes for Brain Fog (Hypothyroidism and “Cold Brain Syndrome”): http://www.forefronthealth.com/hypothyroidism-brain-fog/

      Gallbladder issues are also a telltale sign of estrogen dominance which goes hand in hand with hypothyroidism.

  44. Diane Driscoll January 20, 2016 at 12:30 pm - Reply

    I am on unithyroid and cytomel. They can’t regulate my numbers.

  45. Noel Luckie January 24, 2016 at 1:25 am - Reply

    I have suffered Hypothyroidism for the last 20 years and take a 200mcg tablet daily. I have never been educated about the condition and was only told to take the tablet daily. I have regular checks and the results never change nor does the dosage. I would really like as much information about this and how I can help myself by this I mean what foods to eat and not eat. I don`t drink or smoke. Could you please send the info to my email so I can download it and print it out.

    Kind regards.
    Noel.

    PS. Any help would be grateful.

    • Tom Brimeyer January 24, 2016 at 7:41 am - Reply

      Hi Noel, Thanks for stopping by and the best place to get started is with our articles and our 3 Food Thyroid Boosting Protocol. If you sign up for that, you’ll also be on our mailing list and get our regular emails with even more information, tips, etc.

  46. helen January 25, 2016 at 3:11 am - Reply

    hi tom
    this is really useful and interesting.
    i have just been diagnosed with hashimotos and as a result im going through early menopause. Im 42 and hashimotos was discovered i me and my partner had been trying for a baby but with no success. devestated is not the word. in the short would hrt help me? im currently on the lowest dose of thyroxine you can get. which i only take mon to fri and the endocronologist has said it has helped. im now gluten free.looking for any help and advice i can get at this stage as i dont want to give up on hope on having a baby. thanks in advance tom.
    hayley

    • Tom Brimeyer January 26, 2016 at 12:31 pm - Reply

      Hi Helen, much of what we talk about and do is very supportive of fertility. You shouldn’t be going through menopause at 42. This is clearly a sign of estrogen dominance that needs to be addressed, which is also the primary cause of your hashimoto’s. I don’t recommend HRT at all since they only look at lab values and not the underlying issues. Since estrogen accumulates in tissue and not the blood, most estrogen labs are highly inaccurate and most estrogen dominance women are wrongly prescribed more estrogen.

  47. Corrine Pruitt January 31, 2016 at 10:52 pm - Reply

    I have read several stories here and I am curious. Seems that several of us who have been diagnosed with hashimotos have similar symptoms but how would a pituitary tumor come in to play with your thyroid. If the pituitary gland is your master gland that controls all of your adrenal functions and tells the organs how much chemicals to release to each body part but the pituitary is not properly functioning then what? The last MRI that I had was that the tumor had only grown by millimeters and also showed that I had a partially empty cella which I still do not fully understand what that means or what it can affect. Since the age of 30 I have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism which turned into hashimotos. Had a parathyroid tumor removed 3 years ago. 2 years ago woke up with double vision out of the blue and they called it pseudo tumor cerebri that mimicked a tumor that was not there. Had 2 spinal taps that confirmed my spinal fluid elevated into my brain which caused the double vision. I do my best to educate myself but at some point through all this I have just stopped relying on a answer. I did lose 65 pounds 2 years ago. walked everyday and ate healthy. I did feel better but still suffered a lot. My heart goes out to all of these patients who are obviously are at their wits end as I am and I see that they are desperate for help and a answer but unfortunately there is no miracle cure out there and I know we have to decide to take control to make a change. The thing is when it gets to the point of multiple conditions that become so much more complicated then it also seems to become a study session for most endos as well. I feel lost between the cracks because it will take more than a hour visit with a endo and someone who truly cares enough to do the research on how all these conditions are working against each other. This is my story I share and all though I may never have a answer I do wake up every morning with a will to live and will fight every day for the best quality of life. We get one shot and I pray for a healthy future one day as will do for the rest of these women and men who are leaving you with their story as well. God Bless and much success stories your way Tom Brimeyer.

  48. Victoria February 4, 2016 at 12:35 pm - Reply

    Is there a way to purge excess estrogen? My blood levels were at 435 and my progesterone was only .4 and I’m only 30. (I have three kids 6, 5, and 3). My tsh is still only 2, so not bad compared to others. But recently developed inflammation/goiter on the front of my neck that feels like someone has their hand on the front of my throat. My mom is hypo and my 21 year old brother has hashi’s. Liver blood levesl “look great” according to my doctor, whatever that means, but I’m getting lots of skin irritation and hypo symptoms. Not sure if just a bio-identical progesterone will combat the estrogen and then help the thyroid or if there are any ways to regulate these things BEFORE major issues. I’m also afraid of what may be suggested after my thyroid ultrasound and don’t want to do anything stupid!!

    • Tom Brimeyer February 5, 2016 at 9:31 am - Reply

      Hi Victoria, yes there’s a lot that can be done, but it gets a little more complicated. The inability to detoxify estrogen goes hand in hand with hypothyroidism, but there are other factors that can also increase estrogen production within the tissue itself such as aromatase activity. The best approach is to address the issue from all directions. As for progesterone, you have to be very careful. Estrogen blocks the proteolytic enzymes that allow the gland to release thyroid hormone causing the thyroid gland to enlarge. Progesterone has the opposite effects and can cause the gland to unload, which can push you into a transient hyper state. This can be rather uncomfortable.

  49. Cam February 6, 2016 at 11:43 am - Reply

    Do you see clients in NY?

    • Tom Brimeyer February 6, 2016 at 7:11 pm - Reply

      Hi Cam, I work with clients all over and internationally through phone consultations.

  50. Carolyn Z February 8, 2016 at 9:47 am - Reply

    I had Graves disease and RAI in 1994, been on levothroxine since then.I was diagnosed with IDC, breast cancer, estrogen positive, had lumpectomy with clear margins and clear lymph nodes on 11/26/14. I have been on arimotase inhibitors since 1/2015. I am now 73 years old,should I change to a different natural synthroid and follow all of the cleansing methods you describe?

    • Tom Brimeyer February 9, 2016 at 6:57 am - Reply

      Hi Carol, Sorry to hear about everything you’ve been through. Estrogen dominance and hypothyroidism go hand in hand including over-activation of the aromatase pathways, which is something that we work to address as well. I can’t recommend any changes to your medication, but I would recommend that you talk to your doctor about trying a source of desiccated thyroid instead of a T4-only like Synthroid. And everything we teach and talk about will still apply 100%.

  51. Lacee February 12, 2016 at 7:57 pm - Reply

    I was diagnosed with hashimotos hypo at age 14. I’ve been taking levothyroxine since then and I’m 21 now. I have a very clean diet and excercise everyday and still cannot lose weight. I still have hot flashes and am always fatigued. I have a small goiter. I have not had help from any endocrinologist I’ve seen.

    • Tom Brimeyer February 15, 2016 at 7:19 am - Reply

      Hi Lacee, having a goiter means that your thyroid gland is being directly blocked by the effects of estrogen. That’s just one example with respect to your thyroid hormone pathway becoming blocked as described in the article.

  52. Sophia February 14, 2016 at 1:03 pm - Reply

    Dear Tom
    I read this article and the one about healing the liver and I am confused. I can’t follow your recommendations to drink coffee or take supplements as they cause palpitations and insomnia for me. Dessicated thyroid does it even in tiny amounts.

    • Tom Brimeyer February 15, 2016 at 7:21 am - Reply

      Hi Sophia, when that happens it means that your liver is depleted of glycogen. Fix that and you’ll be able to tolerate both coffee and thyroid without a problem.

  53. Erin February 15, 2016 at 8:23 pm - Reply

    Hi Tom,

    I’m so new to all of this, I don’t know where to start. Recently diagnosed with Hashi’s, but with a normal TSH and elevated FT3. Then also diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis. I keep trying to figure out if the 2 are related, but my GP doesn’t seem to think so. Would this program work for me?

    Thanks
    Erin

    • Tom Brimeyer February 16, 2016 at 7:45 am - Reply

      Hi Erin, hashimoto’s a a result of long term estrogen dominance and the estrogen also makes you susceptible to developing other autoimmune conditions. This is something that we do address in detail in our HR Program.

  54. Angela Kraay February 29, 2016 at 8:30 pm - Reply

    Gidday Tom. Great site you have and very informative. You sound like someone to talk to. Really appreciate it. These poor people.. all with the same conditions and being mislead. I have hashimotos, been multinodular, cysts, painful thyroid, alopecia, vitiligo, palpitations,HBP and ALL of the side affects one experiences when on TRT.

    I have come to the conclusion that I have a high sensitivity to thyroxine. When I am off the meds all of the above cease except for vitiligo. Even all thyroid cysts and inflammation have disappeared. Bloods are coming back with readings for Hashimotos. (This I have had for 30 yrs out of 52 yrs of my life) Auto immune (yes) and all the woman in the family. I have asked myself immune system is dull and lymphatic maybe??? I have had spider bites,(not vemonous)… docs had put me on antibiotics because of reaction. My system did not react to well to this.

    My bloods read..
    TSH 290 m/UL
    fT4 4 pmol/L
    fT3 2. pmol/L
    Anti-thyroglobulin 110 U/mL
    Anti-thyroid Peroxidase Ab. 13000 U/mL

    This is taken when not on thyroid meds. Specialist wanted me to take thyroxine (Oroxine) which is exactly the same as Eutrosixg. Lets talk about when the body has a sensitivity to these drugs. I have also tried whole dessicated thyroid and my body went into shock. I started on L-Tyrosine (Solgar brand) and realising that this doesnt synthesise without Iodine. At one stage this was working for me.. also taking it on an empty tum first thing in the morning with Aloe Liv (has milk thistle). Worked a treat. Unfortunately now can only purchase both these products online. Looking into diet. I also have a Mirena… tried balancing things out with HRT. Oestrogen. Way too hard everything.

    Thank you for your time in reading this and looking forward to your reply.

    Also as I am a natural person

    • Tom Brimeyer March 1, 2016 at 10:54 am - Reply

      Hi Angela, your TSH is extremely high which alone will cause significant inflammation. But in most cases T4-only meds will make things worse as they can further shut down the thyroid gland and liver lowering your T3 levels and your ability to produce T3. Keep in mind that with Hashimoto’s (and autoimmune), excess estrogen is directly involved. Also keep in mind that the Mirena contains synthetic progestins which are quite dangerous.

  55. Angela Kraay March 1, 2016 at 5:53 pm - Reply

    Thank you for your reply Tom. Completely understanding this. Estrogen Overkill my middle name…. I will have to have mirena surgically removed as it has “some what – got lost”. I am ‘scared’ to go under anaesthetic for fear of not waking, as per the amount of anaesthetic I need to be given to put me to sleep. COME ON HORMONES!!!!!

    Keeping all in mind per yr answer, I have tried progesterone cream as a way of balancing estrogen. At the same time whole dessicated thyroid, which put my system into a huge downward spiral spin. I am going back to the good ol L Tyrosine and Aloe Liv. I hunger for good wholesome food, and a good wholesome sleep. Looking at Human body clock and hormones. Holistic approach is awesome. That is what drew my attention when I read your site.

    Thank you for your chat and your wisdom.

    Angie

    • Tom Brimeyer March 1, 2016 at 7:15 pm - Reply

      Takes more than progesterone to balance estrogen and I warn about the effects of progesterone in cases Hashimoto’s as it can cause the thyroid gland to unload too much thyroid hormone leading to a transient hyper-thyroid state. I never recommend blind supplementation without understanding the full effects that they can have. Otherwise its kind of like throwing darts in dark.

  56. Angela Kraay March 2, 2016 at 6:18 pm - Reply

    Thanks Tom, Agree. I will let you know how I go. Already using Milk Thistle 3 times a day as directed on bottle. I think I will get some selenium. Feel like I am needing that. Have cut back on sugar about 3 weeks ago. Feeling better already.

  57. Sally Marcum March 4, 2016 at 10:42 am - Reply

    Have you seen any results using therapeutic essential oils to stimulate the thyroid to a normal level? I am balancing so many issues right now with very painful Neuropathy and pain issues with my low back [all diagnosed and followed closely by a doctor] I can’t control my weight. Just diagnosed with early and light Parkinsons disease. Not being able to exercise vigorously for a long time, and with advancing age, I just can’t get my weight down to a comfortable weight. A properly functioning thyroid would help I am sure. I use many of the therapeutic grade essential oils for a better “feeling” and health benefits. But I am not a doctor and not many people are allowed to tell me what might help. Healthy is my choice vs prescriptions that I have found effect my mental function leading to more misery. I am looking for a routine for a lifetime using what is available as natural and healthy as i can find. I am on a formulated hormone supplement and did try the formulated T3 supplements for several years without seeing a big help with my weight. I am now off the T3 since it was a source of very harsh burning in the stomach.

    BTW, I do have a good doctor that knows about Leaky Gut, Allergies, T3 and other av ante guard treatments that are not normally even addressed by the medical community. He has said leaky gut, candida etc. looking forward to learning more from you.

    • Tom Brimeyer March 4, 2016 at 3:20 pm - Reply

      Hi Sally, we don’t use essential oils and instead focus on research as it related to diet and hormones, which works very effectively for us and our clients. It does sound like many of your health concerns stem directly from hypothyroidism and its effects. But you do have to be careful as most doctors/practitioners go about issues such as leaky gut and candida in the wrong way. Here’s an article that can help explain more about leaky gut: http://www.forefronthealth.com/thyroid-leaky-gut-food-allergies/

  58. linda March 7, 2016 at 1:09 am - Reply

    Hello
    What about Hashimotos where the thyroid is being destroyed over time and is an autoimmune disease? I understand that is not reversible – what are your thoughts? can this be treated the same as hypothyroidism?

    • Tom Brimeyer March 7, 2016 at 6:37 am - Reply

      Hi Linda, the first thing to understand is that just because you have the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies does not mean that they are attacking or doing irreversible damage to your thyroid gland. Studies have shown that in arthritis and sjogren’s syndrome for example that there are very high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies without any negative effect to the gland itself. The only way to know for sure if to get the tissue biopsied for physical signs.

      With that being said, even if your thyroid gland was damage, everything we teach still applies 100%. The only difference is that you will need to supplement thyroid hormone to the degree that you cannot produce it. However, it’s important to understand that just because you take thyroid hormone doesn’t mean that the hormone is getting to your cells. Thyroid hormone can get blocked many places along this pathway. For example, most hypothyroid people can’t convert inactive T4 thyroid hormone to active T3 thyroid hormone that your cells need. Thyroid hormone can also get blocked in the bloodstream, at the cell receptor, etc.

      You can supplement all of the thyroid hormone you want but if you can’t get the hormone to your cells then you will still be hypothyroid.

  59. Tom Keywood March 10, 2016 at 8:16 am - Reply

    Is this a men’s blog or just women?
    I was exposed to massive amounts of radioactivity as a child during the Pacific testing and as a result, have hypothyroidism and palpable nodules on my thyroid as a result. I’m a 67 year old male with low testosterone. I have done the liver cleanse with half olive oil and half lemon juice and have flushed out my liver and kidneys. I want to increase my testosterone levels as I am taking 1 gram of cream twice a day. If anything I need to decrease any estrogen levels in my body. Are you able to advise?

    • Tom Brimeyer March 10, 2016 at 12:25 pm - Reply

      Hi Tom, thanks for reading and this is a blog regarding hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s, and other thyroid conditions. Everything we teach applies to both men and women. As for reducing estrogen, it’s a crucial part of the process and we do it in many ways. But this is one of the easiest ways to get started: http://www.forefronthealth.com/boost-your-thyroid-with-carrot/

  60. Linda March 16, 2016 at 12:39 pm - Reply

    Is there any protocol for hyperthyroidism?

    • Tom Brimeyer March 21, 2016 at 9:44 am - Reply

      Hi Linda, first you would need to accurately assess your thyroid function because what most/many doctors diagnose as hyper-thyroid is actually not true hyper-thyroidism. I would recommend using the following testing protocol that we use with our clients to determine this: http://www.forefronthealth.com/lp/ultimate-thyroid-testing-protocol/

  61. sherry March 20, 2016 at 7:33 pm - Reply

    is hyperthyroid a thyroid that is somewhat dead? and maybe it cant be reversed

    • Tom Brimeyer March 21, 2016 at 9:46 am - Reply

      Hi Sherry, hyper-thyroidism is a condition where the gland itself becomes overactive, producing too much thyroid hormone. Hypo-thyroidism is a condition where the gland is underactive or somewhat dead as you might describe. In both cases, these issues can commonly be reversed. If you need help determining if you are truly hyper-thyroid or hypo-thyroid then I would recommend using this free thyroid testing protocol: http://www.forefronthealth.com/lp/ultimate-thyroid-testing-protocol/

  62. Darci Hunt March 21, 2016 at 10:16 am - Reply

    I see you try to respond to each person. Would you be willing to e-mail me? I have so many questions, and would like to know what you think about my situation.

    • Tom Brimeyer March 21, 2016 at 10:45 am - Reply

      Hi Darci, yes I try to respond to as many as possible because I think questions and answers here will help others who read them as well. If you have a lot of questions and would like to discuss your personal case then it would be best to set up a consultation to do so. You can contact support at support@forefronthealth.com to get this scheduled.

  63. Janis Vincent March 21, 2016 at 11:03 am - Reply

    Hello Tom,
    How do you handle a suppressed thyroid. A blood test revealed that a few months ago.
    Thank you.
    ~Jan

  64. Tara March 21, 2016 at 3:10 pm - Reply

    Tom

    I am at the beginning of this journey with my teenage daughter. We discovered her thyroid issues 4 months ago. What triggered me to get it checked was a sudden onset of severe depression. It cycles very quickly and bottoms out about every 3 days. This is obviously an extreme situtation.

    I thought to get her thyroid checked is because I only recently put together that my hypothyroidism is linked to the anxiety I was diagnosed with in my 20’s. Looking back the onset of that anxiety must have been Hasimotos. 15 years later my liver and kidneys had started to shut down as my thyroid was completely non-functional. What the doctors did know was that my TSH levels were 352 when I eventually couldn’t walk properly. The anxiety only became front and centre again when I went off Synthroid last year to have my thyroid checked with a radio-active trace. Three weeks off medication altogether set me in a spin. Older and wiser I could manage it but still not pleasant. The link became very clear to me when my anxiety disappeared when my levels eventually returned to normal.

    So when my extremely capable and emotionally rock solid kid unravelled so completely only 3 months later I begged the doctor to have her thyroid tested and sure enough she has TPo antibodies and a low T4. We have an endocrinologist appointment in 4 weeks… couldn’t get her in any earlier no matter how I tried. Also waiting to hear back from a naturopath who concentrates on the thyroid.

    She is currently on Effexor XR 150mg but neither her or I believe it is making any difference.. like the previous 2 AD’s she was prescribed in the last 5 months since this extreme onset.. so she wants to be tapered off it.

    What can you tell me about how you would treat her specific presentation? I am very overwhelmed and desperate to help her. Any feedback would be appreciated.

    Tara

    • Tom Brimeyer March 22, 2016 at 7:18 am - Reply

      Hi Tara, depression is a very serious concern and unfortunately the medical approach of SSRI’s and SNRI’s are not a valid solution and oftentimes make things worse by. Research shows that serotonin antagonists are far more effective at treating depression itself. And serotonin can become quite elevated due to hypothyroidism as I describe here: http://www.forefronthealth.com/hypothyroidism-and-insomnia/

      Serotonin is also closely tied to estrogen. And with elevated TPO antibodies and low T4, there are obvious signs that your daughter is estrogen dominant as estrogen inhibits the enzymes that allow the thyroid gland to release thyroid hormone essentially blocking the gland itself. Hypothyroidism oftentimes becomes more severe when young women begin their menstrual cycle as estrogen is secreted in large amounts and if the liver can’t detoxify it properly then it builds up within the system.

      There are many better and much safer options to try.

  65. Lori Vickery March 31, 2016 at 9:03 am - Reply

    Hi Tom,

    i have hashimotos, wont go into detail with my years history of this disease, but interestingly I took myself off NDT because they were giving me SEVERE palpitations, while off my meds I have felt better than I have in YEARS!! But of course since my labs showed everything haywire off meds, doc put me back on. I now am back to square one with all my symptoms back. Why do you think I feel better off meds with all my thyroid levels off the charts than I do with meds and levels adequate?

    • Tom Brimeyer March 31, 2016 at 3:39 pm - Reply

      Hi Lori, what you’re experiencing is the effects of adrenaline. Hypothyroidism sufferers compensate by over-producing stress hormones adrenaline included. And when you take the NDT, it contains T3, which can make you more sensitive to the effects of adrenaline. When this happens we commonly see elevated heart rate, heart palpitations, oftentimes anxiety, etc. The solution isn’t to stop using your thyroid medication but to focus first on lowering adrenaline, which we do predominantly through diet. You can also divide the amount of NDT you use and multi-dose it throughout the day. Using less T3 at one time will help take of the issue in the short term. But you’ll have to determine how much you can tolerate at one time.

  66. Jemilla April 14, 2016 at 2:46 pm - Reply

    Hi Tom,
    Many thanks for sending me the hypothyroidism revolution book, having gone through the book roughly, I could see that you are advising me and other hypothyroidism patients, to take all kinds of foods that I have been told to keep away from in order to minimise my problems with my fibrocystics breasts, so pls pls help me with all these contradicting facts

  67. Janine April 25, 2016 at 5:57 pm - Reply

    They removed my thyroid following thyroid cancer in 1986. I have no thyroid. The doctors I go to today keep lowering my medication levels because the tests show I am HYPERTHYROID even though all my symptoms point to HYPOTHYROID. How can my body need less thyroid supplement than it has my whole adult life and even now with weight gain? HELP. no one will listen to me!

    • Tom Brimeyer April 25, 2016 at 6:04 pm - Reply

      Hi Janine, I’m listening and I hear you. This is a common mistake by doctors who believe you can diagnose hyper-thyroidism based on TSH testing. You cannot. This will be a great resource for you to use which will help you determine just how hypothyroid you really are: http://www.forefronthealth.com/lp/ultimate-thyroid-testing-protocol/

  68. Pam Treu April 28, 2016 at 1:41 pm - Reply

    I may have hypothyroid because I’ve been taking propranalol as well as sertraline, for 7 1/2 years. just started levothyroxine last week, after several years of being on the edge of needing it, according to my nurse practitioner. I got a new one, so now I’m on the meds. hmmm… anyway, I also could have Hashimoto’s because my niece had it, but I haven’t been tested for the antibodies. I go back in July to retest TSH and T4, glucose and triglycerides. only my T4 was normal in March out of those 4 tests. Um, so I’m starting the diet. this week is more of a practice week, as I will be out of town for 5 days next week and won’t be able to follow it properly.

    My question is, IF my hypothyroidism is caused by propranalol, is levo and diet my answer, or should I see about getting replacement meds for the 4 things propranalol helps me with: migraine prevention, high bp, high pulse, PVCs?

    • Tom Brimeyer April 28, 2016 at 5:14 pm - Reply

      Hi Pam, it sounds like your using the Propranolol to control common symptoms of hypothyroidism, estrogen dominance, and excessive adrenaline. Many of the things we do diet-wise will help. T4 only meds are generally not very effective and can make some people worse by further suppressing the thyroid gland. Desiccated thyroid or the addition of cytomel (T3) would be a much better option.

  69. Jerri Arrant May 4, 2016 at 5:45 am - Reply

    How do I find out how to schedule a consultation with you? I believe I have fatty liver which is affecting my thyroid. I also have SIBO and candida. I have lost most of my muscle mass and can’t gain weight. I am extremely underweight.

  70. Louise May 12, 2016 at 2:47 pm - Reply

    Hi! I’m Hypothyroid and extremely frustrated. Tired of being sick and tired!! I’m on Levothyroxine (75 mcg), and just began taking Liothyronine Sod (5 mcg). I was told some patients get better results doing this…taking a “combination” approach to treating Hythyroidism. I was diagnosed a few years ago, after I gained 20 lbs. in 2 mo’s and hadn’t done anything different!!! Hypothyroidism runs in my family. I can’t lose the weight I gained, and have gained more! I lose hair every day, am overweight (when I use to be so thin), have very dry skin, mood swings, very tired all the time (especially afternoon). I’m 57, post menopausal, and obesity seems to run in my family (maybe thyroid related). I was told by my OB/GYN not to take HRT because my mom had a radical mastectomy due to HRT replacement. Also because I’ve had pregnancy related DVT after my last child was born (23 yrs ago). There’s also a history of blood clotting in my family. I’ve tried several ways of losing weight, spoken to 3 doctors, and I’m no better…and very skeptical. I’m sure you can understand. I was told by my primary doctor I have 3 things against me…Thyroid, menopause, and obesity in my genes!!! The endo doctor gave me answers like…you may have to look at your other issues and deal with those!!! I’m here to get your thyroid better.) Ok…so I’m not liking his answers…then I see your article, and all the comments from people. Needless to say I’m a little skeptical. I’m embarrassed by what I look like (190 this morning…I’m wondering if the new med I began 2 days ago is making me gain weight because I gained 5 lbs in the 2 days I’ve been on it…GRRRR). I’m walking a mile a day and eating healthily. Will what you’re suggesting work for me? I don’t want another “try it and see”, fad, false hopes. I’m sorry this is so long…I just need SOMEONE to be honest, really knows what truth is, to help me out! Thanks so much for ANY help you can give me!!

    • Tom Brimeyer May 13, 2016 at 12:03 pm - Reply

      Hi Louise, this isn’t a try and see or a fad at all. What we teach is based on a research and results with myself and our clients. And we have quite a lot of success stories as well. If you have specific questions about our HR Program, this might help: http://www.forefronthealth.com/will-it-work/

  71. michelle May 17, 2016 at 5:22 pm - Reply

    Hi Tom do you have any info on hypoparathroidism? I take the armour throid meds also 4000mg calcium plus vitamin D, with an added amount of 3000IU vitamin D daily.

    • Tom Brimeyer May 19, 2016 at 9:01 pm - Reply

      Hi Michelle, it would depend on how you define hypo-parathyroidism and your blood calcium levels. Generally speaking we like to see low PTH but if blood calcium is low then that needs to be addressed as well.

  72. Nedra May 19, 2016 at 10:07 pm - Reply

    I downloaded the protocol, tried to watch video but it wouldn’t work for me. I’ve just be diagnosed with hypothyroidism and have only been taking meds for 3wks. My doctor gave me nothing to go on, not even a better supporting diet, I’ve been researching and learning more on my own. I want to know what foods are best, which ones to avoid or cut back on. HELP! I want to get and keep this in check before it gets out of control.

  73. Erin May 24, 2016 at 12:36 am - Reply

    Hi Tom! Thank you for this article and your research. In your article you say, “Balance your estrogen and progesterone to activate the enzymes that allow your thyroid gland to release its thyroid hormone into your bloodstream”. But for me that is EXACTLY the problem…I am in menopause and my body is no longer producing the correct amount of estrogen/progesterone my body needs to be balanced. How can I activate the enzymes in my body that need to be activated for my thyroid gland to work properly if the hormones that I need to use to activate the enzymes are out of whack? HELP!!!!

    • Tom Brimeyer May 31, 2016 at 7:15 am - Reply

      Hi Erin, it’s all about balance of estrogen/progesterone. Menopausal women tend to continue to overproduce estrogen via aromatization, while progesterone production is inhibited in the adrenals.

  74. Kate May 29, 2016 at 9:25 pm - Reply

    I’m so happy I found this! I was recently diagnosed with Autoimmune Thyroiditis, but my numbers are weird. My ft4 was 1.1, my tsh is always a little low at .20, and my ft3 is normal. From the symptoms, and how bad my thyroid looked on sonogram, I’ve had undiagnosed thyroid problems for years and years (hypo symptoms). Anyways, my point is,… I’ve always had blood sugar problems, and I have every symptom of estrogen dominance, and I’m so happy to read this 🙂 My endocrinologist just said we should keep an eye on my thyroid, but no medication or anything. I have no idea which thyroid condition I have.
    A weird question, I get sick pretty easily if I have more than 1 alcoholic drink, do you think that could be because of a thyroid related liver problem? Thanks!!!!!!

  75. Julie Cossavella May 29, 2016 at 10:59 pm - Reply

    Hi Tom,

    How do you feel about the use of DIM (Diindolylmethane) for excess estrogen metabolism?

    • Tom Brimeyer May 31, 2016 at 6:25 am - Reply

      Hi Julie, I don’t recommend using I3C or DIM because they also have their own negative effects such as inhibiting metabolism and ATP production.

      And I think more focus needs to be placed on WHY estrogen is excessive and address the underlying issue. For example if estrogen levels are high because of the overconsumption of PUFAs, then simply focusing on detoxification isn’t addressing the real cause of the problem.

  76. Aracelis Gonzalez May 30, 2016 at 4:47 pm - Reply

    Hi Tom, is almond milk a good alternative? I started drinking almond milk because regualar milk gave me severe acne problems.

    • Tom Brimeyer May 31, 2016 at 6:16 am - Reply

      Hi Aracelis, no it’s not something we recommend.

      • margaret October 27, 2016 at 8:26 am - Reply

        Is Coconut Milk OK?

        • Tom Brimeyer October 27, 2016 at 11:03 am - Reply

          Hi Margaret, as long as it doesn’t contain caraageenan, guar gum, or other gums.

  77. Debbie Kelsey June 7, 2016 at 7:57 pm - Reply

    Hi Tom, I had stage 4 lymphoma including liver and spleen cancer back in 1999. I also was diagnosed with Lupus in 1984 after four long years of being told I may need to see a shrink….not uncommon I am told. I recently had a cancer scare, but all was well with that….but I was told by the radiologist that there is no evidence of a thyroid. (this was my first ct scan of my neck ever). I just went to see a nutritionist and homeopathic “doctor” and had a Quantum Biofeedback done on me. I will be meeting up with her next week to go over everything as I had extra blood work done for her. I do know that my liver is an issue.

    Can you suggest anything for me to ask about or do. Thanks!!

    • Tom Brimeyer June 9, 2016 at 9:11 am - Reply

      Hi Debbie, there’s a lot you can do but more so than what can be provided in a comment. If you’re interested in discussing this through a consultation, please contact support@forefronthealth.com

  78. Carol June 14, 2016 at 6:22 pm - Reply

    I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism five years ago and was put on levo. I felt great at first, but then worse. Doctors put me on narcotics for depression and narcotics for fibromyalgia. I found a great site online that gave me a lot of good information about Natural Dessicated Thyroid. I switched to NDT (NPthyroid) sublingual tablets and felt much better, even had less heartburn and acid reflux which I didn’t expect.

    I’ve been weaning myself up from a 1 grain per day dose last year and am now taking 3 grains per day; 2 gr a.m. and 1 gr. mid-afternoon. I was doing really well up until about four months ago. I increased my dose to 3.5 grains and everything went to hell. Not sure if it was the increase in NDT or something else, but my heart palpitations came back with a vengeance, hair started falling out again, brain fog, mild fatigue. I brought my dose back down to 3 grains two and a half months ago, but all these symptoms have remained.

    Now, my heart palpitations have morphed into something a little more scary. I can feel my heart pounding in my chest and it seems to skip beats. I checked my resting heart rate and it’s 78 which is supposedly good but I can feel the skipped heartbeats in my fingertip while taking my heart rate in my neck, so I know it’s really happening. I have an appointment with a cardiologist in the morning. I’m terrified he’s going to take me off NDT and put me back on the synthetic stuff that made me feel even worse when I was on it years ago.

    Besides the NDT, I take daily:

    200 mcg Selenium
    400 mg Magnesium w/ 25 mg B6
    1000 iu Vitamin D
    1000 mg Vitamin C
    400 iu Vitamin E

    I tried adding a Calcium supplement at about the same time I increased the NDT to 3.5 grains and that is when I started getting the heavy, slow, skipping heartbeats so I discontinued the Calcium thinking that was what made this happen to my heart but the symptoms remained, so I reduced my NDT back to 3 grains.

    I don’t know what is going on with my body, it’s a little frightening. Yesterday, my heart didn’t act up at all but most days it does.

    Do you have any suggestions? Anything offered is appreciated.

    Thank you.
    5000 mcg B-12 (recently added in the last week)

  79. Debbie Powell June 14, 2016 at 8:42 pm - Reply

    Hi Tom,

    I am hypothyroid and take thyroxine 100mg daily. Someone whos husband is hypothyroid asked me if i had Hashimotos Disease, i didnt know so i asked me Dr. He said only hyperthyroid patients get hashimotos is that true?
    I dont know too much about hypothyroidism apart from the symptoms i have. Please steer me on a path to make me feel and be better, eg diet, detox anything. Thanking you in advance……Debbie

    • Tom Brimeyer June 19, 2016 at 7:20 am - Reply

      Hi Debbie, no that’s not true. Hypothyroidism leads to estrogen dominance, and over time as estrogen becomes more dominant and unopposed it oftentimes contributes to the development of Hashimoto’s. In most cases, when hypothyroidism exists for a long period of time and is not addressed, it can further develop into Hashimoto’s, hypothyroidism with an immune component.

  80. Karen Sherrod June 20, 2016 at 8:38 am - Reply

    Hi Tom,
    I am taking 50mg. Synthroid and 5mg. T-3 twice daily along with HRT. My TSH is 0.68 but issues I’m having are dealing with migraines. My free T 3 and Free T 4 levels are in the low end of the range. Labs show that my estrogen levels are really low( probably pill form is no longer working- cream is better I’ve heard), but you always talk about estrogen being bad for our thyroid so my dilemma is whether or not to try and get off estrogen. I’ve tried in the past but can’t sleep and hot flashes didn’t help either. The migraines are what’s killing me though. I have some hip pain and would like to lose 5 lbs. which I’m having trouble losing. Wondering if my thyroid pathways are blocked from estrogen. Can you tell by numbers I’ve given you? Thanks for any suggestions. Karen

  81. genee schock July 4, 2016 at 8:01 am - Reply

    Hi Tom . I am unable to take my full dose of nature thyroid as I get hyper jittery jaw and headache and insomnia. My iron levels are fine and I had the adrenal saliva test and that is also ok. I am not sure how to proceed , my doctor does not know what to do

    • Tom Brimeyer July 6, 2016 at 7:29 am - Reply

      Hi Genee, that’s because the T3 is making you sensitive to adrenaline, amplifying its effects. Desiccated thyroid should always be multi-dosed, which can help. But many need to start on a smaller dosage and increase slowly.

  82. Leonie July 13, 2016 at 4:22 am - Reply

    I have hereditary fructose intolerance,hypothyroidism how does that fit with this diet?

  83. JB July 17, 2016 at 6:33 am - Reply

    Tom, I have no thyroid gland. My gland was removed and I have been feeling totally unwell since removal in February 2014. However I am not able to find information – any books etc. for people like myself who have to gland. What to eat? What to expect? How to get healthy. HELP!!!!

  84. mahrokh August 9, 2016 at 8:42 am - Reply

    Hi,
    my name is mahrokh ,I am 62 years old ,I,ve been taking synthroid .075MG levothyroxine sodium for more than 20 years, please help me what to do to get ride of that .please tell me what kind food and vegetable and fruit is good to eat .
    thanks

  85. Britt Bergkvist August 10, 2016 at 7:40 am - Reply

    Hi, How to “Detoxify the high levels of lactic acid” ?

    • Tom Brimeyer August 15, 2016 at 7:33 am - Reply

      Hi Britt, lactic acid is over-produced due to dependence of poor metabolism (glycolysis). So, we do this by restoring oxidative metabolism.

  86. Jennifer Campion September 10, 2016 at 11:45 am - Reply

    I Just left the ER.. They told me my TSH was over 300 and have myxedema.. I was diagnosed with Hashimotos, thyroiditus and hypothyroidism after my first tour in Iraq in 2004, its 2016 and I’m sick of the roller coaster ride!! The Endocrinologist wouldn’t listen to me when he had me at 224mcg of name Brand synthroid for 3 years and I told him it wasn’t working and still felt like crap so I stopped taking it 🙁 bad idea… I have been on levothyorix and synthroid over the years. Neither seem to work. So now I have to start all over again.. Every six weeks of blood test again until the TSH levels balance out again but it’s not going to make me feel any better… Any advice on how to get them to listen and figure out what else is wrong

    • Tom Brimeyer September 12, 2016 at 1:23 pm - Reply

      Hi Jennifer, sorry to hear about all that you’ve been through. T4-only meds don’t typically work, which is fairly obvious in your case. Your choices are to work with your doctor to try an alternative medication or find a new doctor who will. Here’s a good resource for requesting desiccated thyroid from your doctor: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/dear-doctor/ Or, here’s a site that provides some recommended doctors if you need to find an alternative: http://www.thyroidchange.org/list-of-doctors.html

  87. Sarah November 21, 2016 at 1:06 pm - Reply

    Hi Tom, I have read through all the info above and am in hopes that you may have some insight for me as well. I read over and over here and other places about estrogen dominance. But nothing on people like myself with no ovaries or uterus (complete hysterectomy and oophectomy at age 37 due to fibroids, 13 of the little buggers. Now at 68 and a very slow metabolism and hypothyroidism I am offered thyroxine, period. When I questioned my endocrinologist on the bone thinning side effect of both the hysterectomy and the medication, I was basically dismissed. Fast forward to a year later, still taking the thyroxine, took a fall and shattered my wrist. Hellooo, thin bones. So, I decided to heck with that endo and took myself off the medication so the wrist could heal and forced myself to dose daily with bone broth and the wrist healed up quickly (a plate and 8 screws later). Now, I have gained nearly 100 pounds and am cruising dangerously close to diabetes. I don’t use sugar at all except for a teaspoonful in my 1 cup of coffee in the morning and whatever I get from the fruit in my diet. I don’t touch artificial sweeteners or cookies or cakes or doughnuts or the like. I try to eat sensibly. I have sleep troubles. My tummy doesn’t want to digest as it should. This is just crazy. Will this program help me since I have really no estrogen at all?

    • Tom Brimeyer December 2, 2016 at 12:49 pm - Reply

      Hi Sarah, many of your symptoms, including your hysterectomy, are common signs of estrogen dominance. Your body will continue to produce estrogen via the aromatase pathway, which is one of the most common causes of estrogen dominance. So, the problem is that you have no estrogen. It’s progesterone that can’t be produced adequately without the ovaries. I’ve written more here: http://www.forefronthealth.com/hypothyroidism-and-estrogen/

  88. Åsa December 23, 2016 at 5:20 am - Reply

    HI TOM, thanks for a lot of great info!
    I wonder when I see this about building your own heat lamp, if that has similar effect as to using the near infrared sauna? I have one, love it, but sometimes it makes me rather tired after using it. I thought your info about makig sure you eat something before was great!
    Also if you have leaky gut is the food on your protocol still good to use?
    Thank you for your dedicated work!

    • Tom Brimeyer January 11, 2017 at 4:36 pm - Reply

      Hi Asa, the if the infrared sauna is for heat, it will increase metabolic rate, which can quickly lower blood sugar and cause fatigue. Try having a bit of orange juice at the same time and see if that helps. As for leaky gut, I cover that in detail here: http://www.forefronthealth.com/thyroid-leaky-gut-food-allergies/

  89. Beth February 20, 2017 at 11:53 am - Reply

    so complicated it makes my head spin. My menopause doctor (BHRT) put me on dessicated thyroid (60 mg) and I can’t say it’s done a darn thing. I might have s smidge more energy.

    I wish there was a simple 3 steps to start off with and then here are the next 5 and now add this and you should be in the road to better liver/thyroid health. As I started out with…it’s all so complicated I find it difficult to stay on point…

    • Tom Brimeyer February 20, 2017 at 12:11 pm - Reply

      Hi Beth, I would recommend starting with our 3 Food Thyroid Boosting Protocol:

      http://www.forefronthealth.com/lp/thyroid-boosting-daily-protocol/

      We do have other resources such as our Hypothyroidism Revolution Program, which walk you through our process to correct thyroid dysfunction in a step-by-step manner. You just have to follow along and check off the checklist as you go.

  90. Adan April 9, 2017 at 8:25 pm - Reply

    I have no active tyrod gland. I mean I took radioactive iodine 18 year ago. I have to
    say no matter what I do or medication take I have never felt the same again. My energy levels always is a problem.

    Do you think your program can help me?

    • Tom Brimeyer April 10, 2017 at 8:20 am - Reply

      Hi Adan, I’ve written about thyroid health after RAI treatment and thyroidectomy here: http://www.forefronthealth.com/rai-and-thyroidectomy/

      The short answer is yes, everything we teach still applies 100%. The only difference is that you will need to supplement thyroid hormone to the degree that you cannot produce it. However, it’s important to understand that just because you take thyroid hormone doesn’t mean that the hormone is getting to your cells. Thyroid hormone can get blocked many places along this pathway. For example, most hypothyroid people can’t convert inactive T4 thyroid hormone to active T3 thyroid hormone that your cells need. Thyroid hormone can also get blocked in the bloodstream, at the cell receptor, etc. You can supplement all of the thyroid hormone you want but if you can’t get the hormone to your cells then you will still be hypothyroid. We focus on all facets of the thyroid.

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